Simon Griffee Design Photography Writing Illustration

March 2007

Hill, Badlands, South Dakota, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 29

The coarse texture of the hills between the lush and dry areas of the Badlands is emphasized by low light near sunset.

Badlands Near Sage Creek, South Dakota, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 28

The contrast between the lush green rolling mounds and the dry, barren rock formations is striking in the Badlands of South Dakota. The Badlands contain one of the last remaining areas of plains with native, biologically-diverse vegetation in the US—Buffalo Gap National Grassland. The rest has been stomped and eaten to extinction.

Parked Van, California, US, March 2007

Published 2007 March 27

On Highway 1, near Mendocino.

Danny, South Dakota, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 23

Back in South Dakota, June 2005. A nice man named Danny warned us to take a different road as the storm was up ahead and causing lots of damage.

Hare, Badlands, South Dakota, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 23

This is a good example of a photograph with elements that work which weren’t noticed at the moment of capture. The curved shapes of the reeds recall a jumping motion.

It’s also an example of a ‘low key’ picture, with predominantly dark tones, in this case reflecting the late time of day when the photo was taken.

Boys in Via del Corso, Rome, Italy, June 2004

Published 2007 March 22

A break from storms and the American landscape. I’m looking forward to returning to Rome and its candid people! Aiii belliiii

Clearing Storm, South Dakota, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 20

The downpour can be clearly seen here in the distance. Driving around storms and watching them from their edges defined my trip through Iowa and Eastern South Dakota.

Storm and Road, South Dakota, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 19

The storms continued in Western South Dakota, always driving on the edge of them, somehow managing to avoid the downpours.

Lightning Night, Near Platte, South Dakota, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 15

The second night camping was an unnerving one. We had driven for eleven hours skirting powerful storms in Iowa and South Dakota.

We arrived at a campground next to the Missouri river at night. It was hot, but there was no rain and no sound apart from the wind breaking off tree branches, which made the constant lightning flashes all around all the more strange and terrifying.

The flashes continued throughout the night, without stopping, as if we were surrounded by angry gods engaged in fierce battle.

Mississippi River, Near Lansing, Iowa, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 14

View of the Upper Mississippi River ‘wildlife and fish refuge’.

Tornado Warning, Near Thompson, Iowa, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 12

Driving on the back roads in South Dakota, listening to the radio, the operator’s voice warning of powerful storms and possible tornados directly in our path, a palpable feeling of power in the air.

Shortly after the sky turned dark blue. Then dark grey. And then dark brown and black.

Tornado Warning #2, Near Thompson, Iowa, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 12

The edge of the storm was frighteningly well-defined.

Tornado Warning #3, Near Thompson, Iowa, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 12

Skirting the storm.

Canoe, lifeguard, clouds and buildings, Chicago, Illinois, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 9

Beach in Chicago. Lake Michigan’s fresh water was cold here.

Brickwork, windows and wires, Chicago, Illinois, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 7

View from the L-Train over Chicago.

Phil Guy, Chicago, Illinois, US, June 2005

Published 2007 March 5

A year before seeing Buddy Guy in San Francisco I saw his brother Phil play in Chicago. The venue was Buddy’s own Legends (Buddy Guy’s Legends Blues Club.). Phil Guy is a terrific guitarist and singer, coalescing many different blues styles into his own repertoire. I recommend his album Funky Booty, which I bought directly from him that night.

Buddy Guy, San Francisco, California, US, February 2006

Published 2007 March 2

Seeing Buddy Guy (BuddyGuy.net) play at the Fillmore (Wikipedia - The Fillmore.) was a dream come true. Got there early, went to the front, directly below the stage.

Focusing with the 300D in the dark is a challenge—you can’t trust the auto-focus, you can’t see clearly through the small viewfinder, even with the f/1.4 50mm lens. No matter, the soft focus here works well as an expression of that night’s feeling.

Buddy Guy plays the way life should be lived: With passion, with love and laughter. He inspired everyone from Jimi Hendrix to Stevie Ray Vaughan, and at 70, continues on the road, a bright blue ray of light in the world. Listening to Buddy Guy is an incredible experience.

Stanford Campus, Stanford, California, US, April 2006

Published 2007 March 1

Taken on one of my trips to crash design classes and cause trouble with Frankie.

← Notebook Archive